Beef(less) Stew

This recipe came from a combination of the Quick and Easy Vegan Stew recipe I posted earlier by the darling Emily Moore. I wanted to make a thick and hearty stew to make it through these cold, wintry nights but also wanted that heavy, beefy, meaty flavor. Gardein did a marvelous job coming up to bat and this Beef(less) Stew knocks all others out of the park! 

Beef(less) Stew
Serves 2
So thick you'll need a hammer and chisel
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
25 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 bag beefless tips (or beef substitute) - $3.49
  2. 1 can tomatoes and okra - $0.79
  3. 1 can white beans - $0.99
  4. 1 can peas and carrots - $0.79
  5. 1 bag whole wheat gnocchi - $1.99
  6. 1 white onion - $0.49
  7. 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  8. 2 tsp salt
  9. 2 tsp black pepper
Instructions
  1. Thaw the beefless tips in the refrigerator the night before. Dice and sauté the onion in the vegetable oil for 5-7 minutes or until translucent. Add the beefless tips and sauté for an additional 2 minutes. Set aside for later. In a large sauce pan, combine the tomatoes and okra, white beans, peas and carrots, gnocchi, salt, and pepper. Heat over medium until it bubbles. Toss in the beefless tips and onions and cook for about 5 minutes or until warmed through.
Notes
  1. Seriously, this stew is almost as good as a big warm hug!
Adapted from the depths of my brain
Adapted from the depths of my brain
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/
Gardein is the brand that I chose but there are others. Test out a few and use your favorite one!
Gardein is the brand that I chose but there are others. Test out a few and use your favorite one!
You can use other types of onions but white onions really give the beefless tips a bite when you sauté them together.
You can use other types of onions but white onions really give the beefless tips a bite when you sauté them together.
Try not to overcook the beefless tips. Technically, they are pre-cooked but if they are sautéed for too long they will get mushy.
Try not to overcook the beefless tips. Technically, they are pre-cooked but if they are sautéed for too long they will get mushy.
The broth that develops from sautéing the onions and beefless tips together is amazing. This combo of beef and onions can be used with other dishes such as stroganoffs or sauces.
The broth that develops from sautéing the onions and beefless tips together is amazing. This combo of beef and onions can be used with other dishes such as stroganoffs or sauces.
Okra in this recipe adds a touch of tang and texture
Okra in this recipe adds a touch of tang and texture.
Adding the white beans will bring out the earthy flavors in this stew; you may omit this ingredient for a subtler stew
Adding the white beans will bring out the earthy flavors in this stew; you may omit this ingredient for a subtler stew.
I added the peas and carrots because my mother would add them to most of our dinners. This combo reminds me of my childhood and thus, I included them in this warm, hearty, stew.
I added the peas and carrots because my mother would add them to most of our dinners growing up. This combo reminds me of my childhood and thus, I included them in this warm, hearty, stew.
Most beef stews have potatoes. Instead of the classic potato, I decided to add the gnocchi as a compliment
Most beef stews have potatoes. Instead of the classic potato, I decided to add the chewy gnocchi as a compliment to the tender beef tips.
The depth of flavor in this stew is amazing; you can taste each ingredient one after the other.
The depth of flavor in this stew is amazing; you can taste each ingredient one after the other.
Yum. Just yum!
Yum. Just yum!
I usually make this in large batches; just double or triple the recipe and store it for later. It keeps VERY well; it almost tastes better after sitting and marrying in the fridge for a day.
I usually make this in large batches; just double or triple the recipe and store it for later. It keeps VERY well; it almost tastes better after sitting and marrying in the fridge for a day.

 Make sure you pair this homey, hearty, stew with a nice full glass of full-bodied, dry, red wine.

Cream of Corn Casserole

Welcome back to the Impoverished Vegan!

It has been an embarrassingly long time since I have posted. I do apologize. As infrequently as I post, I would expect to have lost all of my following; if anyone is still out there clinging on to the remnants that was once a pretty regularly updated, inexpensive, vegan recipe blog, here is a new one for ya!

I adapted this recipe from Paula Deen. *ducks to avoid flying objects* Okay, okay, so I disagree with her too! But she loves butter. And I love butter. And my food loves butter. So it all works out.

Cream of Corn Casserole!
Serves 3
A vegan version of the ever-popular southern casserole.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 can whole kernel corn, drained
  2. 1 can cream-style corn
  3. 1 can french-style green beans, drained
  4. 3/4 cup corn meal
  5. 1 cup vegan sour cream (Tofutti >)
  6. 3/4 cup vegan butter, melted (Earth Balance >)
  7. 2 cups vegan mozzarella (Daiya >)
  8. 2 cups vegan cheddar (Daiya >)
  9. 1 can french fried onions
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Melt the butter. Combine all the corn, green beans, corn meal, sour cream, and butter in a medium mixing bowl. Stir to combine. Fold in 1 cup of each cheese. Place the mix evenly in a casserole dish. Spread the remaining cup of cheddar on top. Layer the french fried onions next. Lay the last cup of mozzarella on top as the final layer. Bake for 30 minutes or until the cheese and onions are melty and crispy. Remove from oven and let sit for 5 minutes. Serve warm!
Notes
  1. I added green beans because I love them so very much. You may omit them, although they give the casserole a heartier body. Cheddar is the usual topper for this casserole; I added in mozzarella to pair with the cream-style corn. They work exceedingly well together to make a creamy taste.
Adapted from Paula Dean's Corn Casserole
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/
vegan cream of corn casserole
Combine the corn, butter, corn meal, sour cream, and green beans
vegan cream of corn casserole
Fold in the cheeses
vegan cream of corn casserole
Place in a casserole dish
vegan cream of corn casserole
Cheddar and mozzarella combine to create a tangy yet creamy taste
vegan cream of corn casserole
Crispy goodness!
vegan cream of corn casserole
Cheesy goodness
vegan cream of corn casserole
The finished product

 

I am not dead.

I am not dead. I have not abandoned veganism OR my blog! In this season of my life, I am faced with one of the most difficult semesters of Architecture School ever. It is integration year, which means taking every specialty like sizing structure, air conditioning, lighting, and heating to combine them in one project. That is right. I have to design every aspect of a 4 story office building. From the foundation to the parapets on the roof to the size of each column and beam, I have to make construction quality drawings of this building. On top of that, I am working almost full time hours and still managing to get some sleep once in awhile. Anyway, for now all that I can give you now is tiny updates. I plan to return to regular posting of my own concoctions as soon as this semester ends.

Before the frigid cold of winter arrives, prepare with these wonderfully warm recipes! It is most definitely soup season and sweater weather! Grab a cardigan and graze on these delectable dinners!

Here are 10 recipes from One Green Planet using squash!

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/how-to-cook-cook-comforting-fall-foods-with-winter-squash/

Review: Victoria Vegan Alfredo Sauce

I was walking through EarthFare shopping for vegan cheeses to use in a vegan lasagne and as I was perusing the sauce isle, I came across this jar of VEGAN ALFREDO SAUCE! Super stoked, I purchased the $7.98, 18 oz jar of sauce, much to the chagrin of my wallet. 

We had lasagne that night but the next night I was planning a great meal of steamed asparagus, spinach salad, and penne pasta with Alfredo sauce. As I was pouring the sauce into the pot to heat, I noticed chunkules and a certain grittiness to the sauce. I thought it was just how the sauce consisted when it was cold. 

Putting the sauce on warm-low heat, I started gathering the supplies to cook the penne and construct the salad. It could not have been more than 3 minutes later that I got out a spoon to stir the sauce and on the bottom of the pan, a thin, filmy layer of brown goop had formed in the alfredo sauce. Hmm… this was unusual. I did not have the sauce on a high temperature and it has already started burning? Weird. 

I tried to stir the sauce lightly so as to not stir up the burnt bits. When the salad was complete, I looked at the ingredients of the sauce; surprisingly, it was exceedingly similar to a sauce that I make every so often! 

Victoria uses cashew cream as the base of her alfredo with garlic and rosemary to flavor it. My mind put two and two together. The grittiness was little bits of cashews that were not completely blended up into the sauce! 

When the noodles were finished, I leerily poured the sauce over the penne and served our dinner. We took bites. OH! At first taste, I liked it. The tanginess of the sauce complimented the creamy aspect. A distinguished after taste set in. It was sour, almost like lemon juice. Jonathan thought so too. I noticed the grittiness I noticed when starting the sauce remained in the cooked sauce. There were little tiny pieces of cashew that remained rigid against the tongue. 

We both switched over to finishing the salad and asparagus without another word about the alfredo sauce. When we finished eating the pasta, I asked what he thought of it. I could tell he did not want to insult the dinner but we both agreed that the sauce was subpar. 

Unfortunately, the sauce does not reflect alfredo at all; even as a standalone pasta sauce, the flavor is not that great and the texture is even weirder. It was not a horrible experience, but this vegan alfredo sauce was vastly different than what I expected. 

I am sure different taste buds have different sensors and such so I suggest you at least give it a try! As for us, we will not be purchasing this product again. Sorry Victoria, but this just is not for us. We do certainly appreciate the attempt concern for creating vegan food items. 

The Verdict:

Taste:         6/10
Texture:      4/10
Price:         4/10
Value:         3/10

Score:        45%  
                    F

Crispy Grilled Cheese & Tasty Tomato Soup

 

Matt’s Homemade Tomato Soup
Serves 2
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 Tomatoes ($0.75)
  2. 2 cans diced tomatoes ($1.25)
  3. 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil ($1.50)
  4. 2 tbsp onion powder
  5. 2 tbsp garlic powder
  6. 2 tbsp dried parsley
  7. 2 tbsp dried basil
  8. 2 tbsp dried dill
  9. salt and pepper to taste
  10. 2 tbsp red pepper flakes (optional)
Instructions
  1. Blend all ingredients
  2. Heat in pot until warm
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/
This combination of foods and flavors will change your life. I am just throwing that out there. We have created a  cosmic concoction of ingredients! Everything about this dinner is easy, quick, inexpensive, and delicious. We were blown away. Here is what you do.

 
 
 
 
SERVING SUGGESTION! If you use the red pepper flakes, top with
vegan sour cream and some extra parsley for surprisingly
spicy variation of this already delectable soup! (Tofutti)
 
 
GRILLED CHEESE
 
Vegan Grilled Cheese
Serves 1
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Prep Time
2 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
12 min
Prep Time
2 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
12 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 slices of whole grain bread
  2. 2 tbsp vegan butter (EarthBalance)
  3. 2 tbsp vegan mayonnaise (Vegenaise)
  4. ½ cup vegan cheddar
Instructions
  1. Lay the bread out and spread 1 tbsp of butter on one slice.
  2. Spread the mayonnaise on the other slice.
  3. Lay the cheese on the slice with mayo.
  4. Put the slice with butter on top of the other slide with the buttered side facing up.
  5. Preheat a pan on medium. Once heated, place both slices buttered side down on the pan.
  6. Let sizzle and spread the remaining 1 tbsp of butter on the top of the bread.
  7. Once browned and crispy, flip the sandwich over to the other side and let sizzle again.
  8. Once both sides are browned, the cheese should be melted and the grilled cheese is ready!
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/
 

Terrifying Taiji Traditions pt 1

Even if you do not follow animal activists and vegan news blogs, you may have heard some scandal over the dolphin hunting in Taiji, Japan. News coverage has leaked to some major networks and the outrage is spreading.

A little back story:

Taiji fisherman have been hunting, fishing, and whaling since the early 12th century. Since the early 17th century, there has been a commercial industry for it. Being so heavily surrounded by the Pacific Ocean, it is no wonder that Japanese traditions have been oriented around the ocean. Traditionally, hunting begins in September and lasts until April. Men would go out to spot a pod of dolphins and when spotted, they would slice the neck of all the dolphins, causing exsanguination, or blood loss, to end their lives. This method was eventually banned so the hunters moved to a different method. They would lower one end of a steel pipe into the water. Using a hammer or mallet, the fishermen would clash and clang the pipe in order to make loud, irritating sounds spread in the water; this alarms and agitates the dolphins. Swimming away from the noises, the men strategically cause a ruckus to drive the dolphins closer to the coastline. At the coastline, other fishermen are waiting with nets to capture the pod. As soon as the dolphins are close enough, they are ensnared and tangled in a net and left overnight to calm down. This is their last night alive. In the morning, the men would pull the dolphins out one by one to slaughtered by shoving a metal pin through the neck and brain stem of the dolphins, dying within seconds. Numerous papers and reports have confessed that this method of slaughter would never be tolerated in the western world, even in the most cruel slaughterhouses. In 1878, a group of fisherman was trying to slaughter a large whale. The whale was very powerful and resisted, pulling many fisherman out of the water; about one hundred men were killed in this incident. Any loss of life is just that, a loss. I wish that humans would not die from animals just as much as I wish that animals would stop dying at the hands of humans.  

Dolphins are sentient, emotional creatures

In Taiji, there is a whale museum which collects different artifacts exhibiting ancient whaling techniques as well skeletal displays of numerous whale species. They have a live tank which is small in size that holds many whales and dolphins. One particular dolphin “living” in the tank is named Angel. She is albino. She was taken from her pod. Her family was slaughtered. She is forced to swim back and forth because the tank is not wide enough for a single dolphin to enjoy a good swim, let alone many dolphins to live together peacefully. Anonymous footage has shown that the other dolphins bully her and push her around. Dolphins are emotional. If a dolphin mother has lost a child, reports have shown that she will nudge her child to the surface to try to revive the passed creature. Angel has been seen to be an outcast and thus reclusive. 

This is only the beginning. I am going to watch the film “The Cove” to learn more about this practice and I will create another post following up.


Yes, that is blood.


Resources:

  • http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888705.2013.768925
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiji_dolphin_drive_hunt
  • http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/02/140202-dolphins-taiji-japan-whales-marine-animal-altruism-science/?rptregcta=reg_free_np&rptregcampaign=20131016_rw_membership_n1p_us_se_c1#
  • http://savejapandolphins.org/blog/post/we-remember-angel
  • https://www.thedodo.com/undercover-footage-captures-wh-458743097.html

Cut Out Dissection

Animal dissection in science classes continues to be a large issue for vegans, vegetarians, and people with any kind of moral compass at all.
Don’t get me wrong, I understand that dissection is necessary for some people: doctors, veterinarians, etc. However, a Biology class required to graduate for art, English, or other unrelated majors should not include dissection at all, much less as a mandatory assignment.

Here is how I, a vegan, was punished for refusing to participate in dissection.

Two weeks ago, we were forced to do a dissection in lab. Crayfish, oysters, and a plethora if little animals were spread all over the shiny, black countertops for us to pick apart with an array of scalpels, forceps, needles, and tweezers. I have some serious moral issues with dissection, as many people do. My teacher informed us that the next week, we would be dissecting fetal pigs and rats. I finally drew the line there and told her that I would not be participating in that and would like an alternative assignment. Even a virtual dissection. At first, she seemed confused and told me that it would be alright if I brought in a dead deer or other animal to dissect. I said that it wasn’t the specific animals I had a problem with, it was with the practice of dissection itself. She told me to get over it; that the pigs would die anyway, and we were just speeding along the process. In fact, we were saving them from their eventual demise…by killing them earlier. Because that makes total sense, you guys.  She also told me to think of it as bacon, which I explained that I didn’t eat, much to her confusion.

I tried to reason with her. I asked if there was absolutely anything else I could do. She said the dissection was mandatory. I talked with my biology lecture instructor, and she said that she too was completely opposed to the practice. An MS in Biology, and this woman has never cut anything open or attended a dissection. She said that although she has pressured the school to offer alternative assignments, they have refused. Tennessee is one of the few states left where they are not required to provide an alternate assignment to students who object to dissections for moral or religious reasons. 

So, I didn’t go. I know, it’s my grade, blah, blah, blah. But y’know, formaldehyde is a known carcinogen, I knew I’d get sick and probably emotional because, hello! baby pigs! I still did the actual grade for the lab by doing my own learning. I filled out all of the “lab questions,” which required much more effort than what the students who attended the dissection had to put in, as I wasn’t there to witness the answers to our questions.

The next week, returning to lab, I brought my lab questions, which were due that day, to my lab instructor. She said that I could not turn them in because I did not attend the lab. Therefore, how would I know the answers to the questions? I told her that I had done my own research online and in our textbook and had written down more-than-adequete answers. She said that it was her policy that students who did not attend lecture were not allowed to turn in assignments for said lecture. 

At this moment, a friend of mine, who has no opposition to dissection, actually yelled out, “He’s a vegan! He’s not going to come in here and cut up dead animals!” The teacher rolled her eyes at me at the mention of the word vegan. She then said that if I had merely let her know that I was opposed to this, she would offer me an alternative assignment. At this point she walked away to poke brains or disembowel kittens or whatever. 

So, I am left with having done the work but not receiving the credit. In the same lab which I attended, she “surprised” the class by bringing in sheep brains and hearts to dissect. Fortunately they were already sliced up as much as necessary, and I never actually had to look at or touch them.

The point of all of this is that I want to know why this is required. Why is it that in an attempt to further my education, I am required to attend a class that does not benefit me in any way but also requires that I violate my own morals. It is an archaic, barbaric practice which does not benefit 90% of the people in the class in any way. I also wonder why I am treated differently than my peers in that class, merely because I am morally opposed to dissection. 



If you’d like, I have the phone number for the school here:


(865) 694-6400

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Savory Spanish Rice & Beans Gratin

My mother would always make us Rice-A-Roni Spanish Rice or Chicken with our dinners growing up. Actually, she started with that “San Francisco Treat” but eventually started to make her own, superior versions of our favorite side dish. She would just add a can of diced tomatoes to the rice and it would give it just that little kick to bring the Spanish flavor! She basically inspired me to get creative when trying to imitate my favorite foods and thus, I created a casserole from one of my childhood side dishes. 

 
 
Savory Spanish Rice and Beans Gratin
Serves 6
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Ingredients
  1. 2 servings rice
  2. 1 can petite diced tomatoes
  3. ½ green pepper, diced
  4. ½ red pepper, diced
  5. 1 can mixed vegetables
  6. 1 can black beans
  7. ½ container of French-fried onions
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350º
  2. Cook rice
  3. Layer rice on bottom of casserole dish
  4. Drain mixed vegetables and pour over rice
  5. Top with French-fried onions
  6. Cook for 20-25 minutes
  7. Let cool for 5 minutes
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/
 
Cooking rice with diced tomatoes adds a richness and tangy depth
This dish is very colorful and vitamin packed!
Avocado is my most FAVORITE food ever. I will seriously add
it to any food ever. Ever. So naturally, I added avocado here
AND IT WAS DELICIOUS!!!
 
 
There you have it, folks. A European twist on the casserole that will be sure to satisfy. Let me know what you guys think in the comments! I hope to hear from some of you. 

Personal Pizzas with Eggplant Crust

Ever thought, why does pizza have to come on a doughy crust? I did too. Well, I was perusing the internets when I came across a unique take on homemade pizzas. Eggplant pizza? What, even? Intrigued, I scanned the recipe; realizing I had the majority of the ingredients I seriously went to Trader Joe’s just to buy an eggplant. Only an eggplant. That’s all. This is the aftermath which a few of my friends so luckily got to enjoy.
 
Photo courtesy of the Instagram: ZeroDecorum
Personal Pizzas with Eggplant Crust
Serves 2
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 eggplant
  2. 1 cup marinara sauce
  3. 4 vegan italian sausages
  4. ½ cup vegan mozzarella
  5. 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  6. Coarse sea salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF
  2. Slice eggplant into ½" slices
  3. Coat both sides of eggplant with sea salt
  4. Let sit for 15-20 minutes
  5. Wipe all moisture and residue off of eggplant slices
  6. Slice sausages and fry them in oil until crispy
  7. Heat marinara sauce until warm throughout
  8. Sprinkle sea salt on eggplant slices and set on an oiled baking sheet
  9. Bake for 20 minutes
  10. Remove slices and top with sauce, sausage, and cheese
  11. Set the oven to broil and place pizzas in for about 3 minutes to melt the cheese
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/

 

Preparation:

 
Preheat the oven to bake at 400ºF. Slice the eggplant into ½ inch slices. If sliced too thin, the salting and baking will cause the eggplant to get soggy and crumble. If sliced too thick, the baking process will not make the eggplant crispy enough to hold the weight of the ingredients. I have found that ½ inch thick slices yield the most sturdy, crispy pizzas; every eggplant is different so you may have to adjust the thickness for your liking. Coat both sides of the eggplant with the coarse salt and let sit for 15-20 minutes. Salt brings out the bitter taste inherent in the eggplant; after 20 minutes wipe all moisture and residue off of the eggplant slices. Slice the sausages and fry them in oil until crispy. Heat the marinara sauce on the stove until warmed through. Lightly sprinkle the eggplant slices with sea salt and set on an oiled baking sheet. Bake for about 20 minutes but do not let the eggplant get mushy when baked too long. Remove the slices and top with the sauce, sausage, and cheese. Set the oven to broil and place the pizzas in for about 3 minutes, just to melt the cheese. Remove and devour. 
 
The smaller end of the eggplant will make mini bite sized pizzas
while the larger end makes personal “pan” pizzas
Place the eggplant slices on a paper towel before salting to ensure
the most moisture is absorbed and the bitterness removed
Sometimes the smaller slices will get crispy quicker than
the larger slices so keep checking while baking and remove if necessary
 
Tofurky is my go-to faux meat
WATCH OUT: Trader Joe’s meatless Italian Sausage contains egg whites!
 
Slice the sausage into ½ inch slices for a more meaty texture
Slice thinner for a crispier variation
I usually place the cooked sausage bites on a paper towel
to soak up that extra oil
I KNOW, I am THAT person who dabs their greasy pizza…
Fav sauce right now: Trader Joe’s Tomato Basil 
Yurm
Whatta feast!
 

Oven Roasted Chili-Crusted Cauliflower

Impoverished Vegan is not dead. I promise. I had a really crazy past few months and had to take a little break from cooking and writing. I had to take a school trip to Washington DC at the end of the semester with finals falling as soon as I got back; I was also in the middle of a huge job change. Things have finally settled down. Enough with the personal details. Let’s cook some cauliflower!!
 
 
Oven-Roasted, Chili-Crusted Caulifower
Serves 2
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
35 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 Cauliflower
  2. 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  3. 1½ cups vegan sour cream
  4. 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  5. 2 tbsp chili powder
  6. 1 tbsp cumin
  7. 1 tbsp garlic powder
  8. 1 tsp curry powder
  9. 2 tsp sea salt
  10. 1 tsp black pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF
  2. Spread olive oil evenly over baking sheet
  3. Peel green, leafy stems from the base of the cauliflower
  4. Cut the base level and flush with the florets so that the cauliflower will sit evenly on a flat surface
  5. Stir the sour cream, lemon zest and juice, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, curry powder, sea salt, and black pepper until fully combined
  6. Dunk the cauliflower into the marinade and spread it across the florets
  7. Place on baking sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes or until browned and slightly crispy
  8. Let sit for 10 minutes before slicing into wedges and enjoy!
Impoverished Vegan http://www.impoverishedvegan.com/

Preparation:

 
Preheat the oven to 400°F. Spread the olive oil evenly over a baking sheet. Peel the green leafy stems from the base of the cauliflower. Cut the base level and flush with the florets so the cauliflower will sit evenly on a flat surface. Stir together the sour cream, lemon zest and juice, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, curry powder, sea salt, and black pepper until fully combined. Dunk the cauliflower into the marinade and spread it across all the florets. Make sure the whole head is covered except the bottom. Place it on the baking sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes or until browned and slightly crispy. The marinade will create a dry crust across the cauliflower. Let it sit for 10 minutes before slicing it into wedges. Enjoy! 
 
 
You can use vegan yogurt instead but make sure it is plain
I added extra cumin and garlic powder for an extra KICK!
Do not be afraid to get your hands dirty to spread the marinade!
Yeah… the marinade looks goopy and gross before it is baked
I use a sheet of aluminum foil to keep the baking tray clean
 
Baking for a little bit extra will make a very crispy crust!
Feel free to experiment with your spices! Use dill and parsley!
For an Indian twist, use more curry powder!
You can cut it into fourths to share with others…
…or just eat the whole thing yourself! (I did.)